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February 22, 2013

Childhood bullying linked to adult psychological disorders

A significant study from Duke, out this week, provides the best evidence we've had thus far that bullying in childhood is linked to a higher risk of psychological disorders in adulthood. The results came as a surprise to the research team. "I was a skeptic going into this," lead author and Duke psychiatry professor William Copeland told me over the phone, about the claim that bullying does measurable long-term psychological harm. "To be honest, I was completely surprised by the strength of the findings. It has certainly given me pause. This is something that stays with people."

I'm less surprised, because as I explain in my new book about bullying, "Sticks and Stones," earlier research has shown that bullying increases the risk for many problems, including low academic performance in school and depression (for both bullies and victims) and criminal activity later in life (bullies). But the Duke study is important because it lasted for 20 years and followed 1,270 North Carolina children into adulthood. Beginning at the ages of 9, 11 and 13, the kids were interviewed annually until the age of 16, along with their parents, and then multiple times over the years following.

Based on the findings, Copeland and his team divided their subjects into three groups: People who were victims as children, people who were bullies and people who were both. The third group is known as bully-victims. These are the people who tend to have the most serious psychological problems as kids, and in the Duke study, they also showed up with higher levels of anxiety, depressive disorders and suicidal thinking as adults. The people who had only experienced being victims were also at heightened risk for depression and anxiety. And the bullies were more likely to have an antisocial personality disorder.

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