Tahlequah Daily Press

College Sports

June 26, 2013

NCAA alters rules for women’s hoops

Women's basketball will incorporate the 10-second backcourt rule, while both men's and women's hoops will endure more monitor reviews.

A sense of urgency will be implemented in women’s basketball once the 2013-2014 season begins. Gone will be the days of using 20 to 30 seconds to break a full-court press.

Thanks to a new rule instituted by the NCAA, teams will only have 10 seconds to toil in the backcourt once the new season begins. The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel met via conference call on Monday and approved a 10-second backcourt rule, which is already in play at the high school and professional level.

“It’s probably good for the game,” NSU women’s assistant coach Matt Cole said. “I think we’re the last level in the sport to not have the 10-second rule in the back court.”

The Women’s Basketball Rules Committee said the goal of the new 10-second rule is to increase the tempo of the game and allow for more offensive scoring opportunities. And as is the case in men’s basketball, the 10-second backcourt count will begin once a player on the floor legally touches the ball. However, officials will determine the 10-second count based on the shot clock.

“I was talking to (NSU forward) Carrington Fox the other night and pointed out that they’re using the shot clock to determine the time,” Cole said. “That’s good that it takes the time out of the officials’ hands, because not everyone’s 10-second count is the same.”

The Playing Rules Oversight Panel also instituted four other changes to both the men’s and women’s game for this upcoming season:

• The panel approved monitor reviews in the last two minutes of regulation and overtime to determine if a shot-clock violation occurred or to determine who caused the ball to go out of bounds on a deflection involving two or more players.

“I get annoyed during the men’s NCAA tournament,” Cole said, “that they don’t trust the shot-clock operators. Now, if it comes to whether a basket counts or not, that’s important. But I hope they don’t continually stop the game to check on the shot clock.”

Monitors will also be used by officials to decide if a two-point or three-point shot — in question — was made during the next media timeout. Video reviews can also be used to determine which player committed a foul when there is uncertainty after a call has been made.

• In order to eliminate frequent stoppages of play, a team-called timeout will now take the place of a scheduled media timeout if it occurs within or up to 30 seconds of the slotted media timeout.

“I like the new media timeouts rule,” Cole said. “Sometimes people use the media timeout to get two timeouts in a row. Sometimes it stops momentum.”

• In women’s basketball, the panel OK’ed a revision to the restricted area rule in the lower defensive box. Meaning, to draw a charge from a player possessing the ball, a secondary defender must be outside the restricted area to draw a charge.

• Finally, with more monitor reviews in place, officials can take a look at elbow contact above the shoulders. The video review will be to determine if a flagrant 2, flagrant 1 or no foul occurred.

The rules committee said that by reviewing the elbow contact it will eliminate the non-deserving flagrant 1 fouls.

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