Tahlequah Daily Press

Columns

July 2, 2012

A wizard and a unibrow

The 2012 NBA Draft sparked an interesting day of commentary along the airwaves and interwebs – particularly as it related to Thunder guard James Harden.

I was shocked to find that even some of my most knowledgeable friends and associates were letting the rumor mill get the best of them; giving way to mid-afternoon panic at the thought of swapping the Sixth Man of the Year for a draft pick – even if it was with the apparent intention of drafting Florida’s Bradley Beal.

Nothing against Beal. I think he’s got a shot to become a nice player in the NBA. But you don’t trade a player like Harden for a prospect like Beal. This wasn’t the 2003 draft. Carmelo Anthony and Dwyane Wade weren’t on the board.

Nothing against my concerned comrades, but their plight was never real. Sam Presti liked Beal. He may have even liked him enough to move Serge Ibaka for him. He definitely liked him enough to move virtually any combination of any of the other non-super heroes on the roster. But he never liked him enough move Harden.

Rest easy, Loud City. Your team is navigated by the best general manager in professional basketball. The anti-Daryl Morey, if you will.

One week ago, Harden said that he “loves it” in Oklahoma City, and that he expects a contract extension sooner than later.

“They’ll do a pretty good job of working it out,” he said. “They’ll figure it out and it’ll be done. This is something special here. A dynasty is being built here. So we’re winning, we’re having fun and we’re brothers.”

Nevermind a certain Wayans Brothers jingle that springs to mind – though it would apply. Harden, along with Ibaka and Eric Maynor, are eligible to negotiate extensions to their rookie deals as of today. At least two of them figure to do so in the coming months.

As for the draft, itself, here’s one last "Three Pointer" at the proverbial buzzer.

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Poll

What to you think of a state Legislature proposal to forbid cities from raising the minimum wage? Choose the closest to your opinion.

The federal government should set the minimum wage across the board.
States should be allowed to raise their minimum wages, but not cities.
Both states and cities should be allowed to raise their minimum wages.
Cities should be allowed to raise their mimum wages, but not states.
There should be no minimum wage at all.
Undecided.
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