Tahlequah Daily Press

Letters to editor

December 23, 2013

Promote women in science

TAHLEQUAH — Editor, Daily Press:

Roles women play in both society and technology have undergone rapid changes the past few decades. Society has moved from phonographs and radios to smart phones and Facebook. We have also progressed from a male-dominated workforce to one where women make up nearly half of working professionals.

It is evident technology is bound to dominate the workforce, yet too few women are entering computer science fields. According to AAUW’s (American Association of University Women) 2010 report titled “Why So Few,” men outnumber women in science-related fields one year after graduation by five to one.

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts 1.4 million job openings in computing-related jobs, but data suggests the number of women working in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical fields will more or less stagnate – unless we make a significant change.

Gov. Mary Fallin helped bridge this gender gap by declaring Dec. 9-15 as Computer Science Education Week for the State of Oklahoma and recognizing the efforts of women in computer science fields.

You can help, too – read a report, learn how to code, celebrate Computer Science Education Week next year, or join AAUW in supporting our efforts to empower women and girls. By taking these small steps together, we can ensure our continued collective progress.

Jeanna Wing, co-president

AAUW/Oklahoma

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