Tahlequah Daily Press

February 22, 2013

Prosecutors mulling report on pit bulldog

By JOSH NEWTON
Staff Writer

PEGGS — Prosecutors are reviewing a report on last week’s killing of a pit bulldog that outraged people across the world and resulted in a number of death threats against the teenager responsible.

First Assistant District Attorney Jack Thorp has Undersheriff Jason Chennault’s report and is in the process of reviewing it. Before a decision is made on whether to charge 18-year-old Caisen Green with a crime, Thorp said he is looking for more information.

“I’ve been back in contact with [Chennault] about some issues I’d like to get cleared up,” said Thorp.

Once the investigation is finalized, Thorp said prosecutors can make their decision.

Chennault completed his report Wednesday morning, a day after he met with Green, Green’s father, and Green’s attorney.

During that interview, Green told Chennault the pit bull and another canine were dumped near his home in Cookson. Green said he tried to scare the dogs away when he was outside target-practicing, but the pit bulldog snarled at him and started moving toward him.

Green said he shot the dog with an arrow when it was about eight yards away from him; the dog then ran away and died.

Green’s father reportedly burned the dog’s body because it looked “diseased.”

According to Chennault’s report, the pit bulldog had been seen by a neighbor on a previous day, and that neighbor verified the canine looked ill.

Chennault said Green, during the interview Tuesday, expressed remorse about the situation.

News of the pit bulldog’s death when Green posted a picture of the dead dog on his Facebook page and included a message directed to “pit lovers.” Several death threats were subsequently made against Green and his family, which forced them to leave Cherokee County last Saturday.

Thorp said he is astonished after seeing some of the threats made against Green.

“It’s shocking what people have said,” said Thorp. “I’m shocked at the amount of threats [Green] has received. One of them is, ‘I would hang him by his neck ... and stab him with 1,000 knives.’”

Thorp said he can understand the anger over the canine’s death – the DA’s office has several dogs that work with investigators and provide therapeutic services in courtrooms – but he doesn’t understand the violent acts threatened against Green.

“I feel for the dog, but now we’re talking about a human; it’s unbelievable how people are responding,” said Thorp.

If investigators look into any of the threats against Green and file a report on their investigation, Thorp said prosecutors will consider charges against the people who made the threats.