Tahlequah Daily Press

June 26, 2013

The camera’s eye

By RENEE FITE
Special Writer

TAHLEQUAH — Fifteen students were chased across the campus of Northeastern State University by a giant tyrannosaurus rex and they have the photos to prove it.

OK, the photos are real but the images have been enhanced a bit by the use of Photoshop and the talents of Camp Director and instructor Cassie Freise.

This week at Impulse Images Photo Camp, students are learning about taking great photos, making new friends and enjoying a week of fun.

“I like that she made the photo look like a dinosaur was chasing us,” said camper Simon Allison, 8. He likes taking pictures of wildlife and the wilderness.

Jerol Skinner brought daughter Aubrey, 9, to keep her active in the summer.

“It gives her something to do, opportunities to meet new people and play,” Skinner said. “It beats sitting on the couch.”

He enrolled his daughter in four of the youth camps offered through NSU this summer.

“She likes the activities and said the leaders are great. They’re obviously creative enough to keep her interested,” Skinner said.

Aubrey Skinner, 9, said she’s enjoying the camp.

“We’ve done illusions, where some of us look close to the camera and others look far back so we look like we’re holding them,” Skinner said. “And I’ve learned I can use a white board instead of a flash.”

She likes photography because it’s a way to save memories with pictures and remember what happened.

Pictures of nature are what Josie Moffitt, 10, said she likes taking. At camp, she’s learning how to take better pictures.

“If you’re close up it makes you look bigger and if you’re far away you look smaller,” Moffitt said.

Katelyn Myers, 8, said she likes getting to play around with the cameras. She likes taking pictures of her family and friends.

“Yesterday, we made pictures and we looked like we were stepping on people,” Myers said.

Debbie Amlin, coordinator with Continuing Education, said there are several “repeaters” attending multiple camps. The camps are a collaboration between Continuing Education and the College of Liberal Arts, she said.

They’re also offering early and late days this summer, for parents who work all day.

“The kids can come at 7:30 a.m. and stay through 5 p.m. for an additional $25,” Amlin said.

Freise said she enjoys making the summer camps available to the community.

“It allows parents to put their kids in a safe and learning environment, and it’s great PR for NSU,” Freise said.

“We want the community to know we’re a part of the community and here to help the community improve.”

The summer camps offer alternative activities during the summer instead of sitting home all day or going to a baby sitter, Freise said, and to be with children their age.

“I love the photo camp, because it allows the children to be both creative and independent, and it allows them to learn both art and science,” she said. “It amazes me how much and how quickly the grasp the concepts and retain the knowledge so well.”

Monday, campers learned creativity and perspective to show them special relationships, said Freise, and they worked on being able to see things without a camera.

 

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