Tahlequah Daily Press

News Updates

October 20, 2012

Slate: Twitter for people who don't like Twitter

Did you watch Tuesday night's presidential debate on one screen or two? If you answered "Why the heck would I need two screens to watch TV?," then you missed half the show. The rest of it was on Twitter, where the nation's journalists, comedians, politicians and armchair pundits were busy dissecting, fact-checking, spinning and riffing on every word the candidates uttered, almost as fast as they could utter it. If you haven't experienced this for yourself, you're probably tempted to dismiss it as noise. And perhaps it would be, if it weren't so influential.

If you've watched or read a news report about the debates this week, chances are it was shaped in some way by Tuesday night's sprawling, real-time, Twitter-hosted conversation. For those tuning in without a second screen, Mitt Romney's awkward remarks about trying to find qualified female applicants for Massachusetts cabinet jobs might have induced a quick cringe. But if you were simultaneously logged into Twitter on your laptop or smartphone, you knew within moments that the phrase "binders full of women" was going to haunt him. "Romney's binders" parody accounts popped up and attracted thousands of followers, a "Binders Full of Women" Tumblr page made the rounds, and the hashtag #bindersfullofwomen rocketed to the top of the site's trending topics list. Users who clicked on it were greeted with a promoted tweet from the Obama campaign urging them to donate, as the campaign rushed to capitalize on the meme.

Within hours Romney's "women problem" had resurfaced as a campaign issue, with the Boston Phoenix fact-checking his claims about hiring women and The New York Times weighing in on how they could swing the election.

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Poll

Do you think "blue laws" related to Sunday alcohol sales in Oklahoma should be relaxed? Choose the option that most closely reflects your opinion.

Alcoholic drinks should be sold Sundays in restaurants and bars, and liquor stores should be open.
Alcoholic drinks should be sold Sundays in restaurants and bars only; liquor stores should stay closed.
Liquor stores should be open Sundays, but drinks should not be served anywhere on Sundays.
The law should remain as it is now; liquor stores should be closed, and drinks should be served on Sundays according to county option.
No alcohol should be sold or served publicly on Sundays.
Undecided.
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