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Almost everyone is familiar with the tale of "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," recited to them in childhood while they sat on the knees of older family members. The moral is that those who tell lies will never be believed, even when they tell the truth – and ultimately, they'll pay the price for the…

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Moria Kinsey, the nurse allegedly slain by a Tahlequah physician last week, was a remarkable person. Grieving friends and family members at a vigil in her honor Thursday night said she had a light in her soul that burned brightly.

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If certain segments of the population or moments in history are worthy of special days of recognition, Juneteenth and Indigenous Peoples' Day should have been on the calendar years ago. But better late than never.

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It's difficult to overstate the seriousness of the plague of domestic violence. It's always been a problem in Oklahoma. And with the pandemic putting couples together more often than they're accustomed, the situation in many households has deteriorated even further.

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If the school district in a small town shut down and children had to be transported elsewhere to get an education, it would have a devastating effect on families. The same would be true if all the clothing stores shut down, and residents were forced to drive to a neighboring city or order fr…

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Despite all the progress made over the past several decades, the "glass ceiling" hasn't been shattered. But it's carrying several serious cracks, and a number of women in Tahlequah have been responsible for wielding the hammer that did the deed.

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As the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle manager for the U.S. Army Intelligence Deputy Chief of Staff in the Pentagon, I oversaw their development and testing. The U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Marine Corps have all trained selected enlisted personnel to operate the ground stations for these various …

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It's easy to take things for granted when you're part of a relatively small, insular community that knows what its "people" want, and goes about on a regular basis making it happen.

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How does a newspaper allow lively, stimulating and intelligent conversation on its social media accounts, while at the same time making it a welcoming environment for all who want to participate?

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Most real community heroes fly under the radar, rarely taking credit for their outstanding work. Sometimes it's like pulling teeth to get them to toot their own horns.

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Any community newspaper that wants to survive has to evolve. That means more than having a website and a digital presence; it means adapting to new ways that can best serve its readers.

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Abortion has long been a pivotal and controversial topic in America. In fact, until the question of mask mandates and COVID vaccinations came around, it was easily the most critical issue of modern times.

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Many long-time Tahlequah Daily Press readers aren't thrilled about the requisite foray into the digital world. They still like to hold the print edition – to feel the newsprint, smell the ink. They also prefer books to e-readers. And many avidly dislike social media, though some have account…

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Reader participation is at the core of a small newspaper's identity. Not only do staffers gather and produce news items they deem worthy of attention, but they also want readers to contribute.

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Just like metropolitan newspapers, small papers like the Tahlequah Daily Press have a key mission to collect news and disseminate it to the public, in an easy-to-read format that makes sense to the average person. But that doesn't always happen - and sometimes, headlines are at fault.

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During a recent Tahlequah City Council meeting, a kerfuffle erupted pitting a group of city officials and employees against officials and staffers at Northeastern Health System. It was a disturbing episode that could signal trouble brewing, but as with national politics, the source of the pr…

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A backlash was to be expected when the Hulbert School District, and then Tahlequah Public Schools, implemented mask mandates for students and employees. There will always be "freedom fighters" who put their own personal comfort above the welfare of their neighbors, and even without that grou…

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Tahlequah has always boasted its share of movers and shakers. During their day, the Hinds and Squyres families cut new ground, and so did the Felts family. Then there have been the Willises, Rozells, Bakers, Mutzigs, Wrights, and of course, the Reasors.

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Far too many Americans have never read the brief text of the First Amendment. And of those who have, an alarming number let its meaning and intent fly right over their heads.

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Elsewhere in the Thursday, Sept. 9, edition of the Tahlequah Daily Press, readers will find pages commemorating the terrorist attacks of 9/11, 20 years ago this Saturday. This is not a slice of history Americans want to celebrate, but one that we must never forget.

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On Aug. 30, the last U.S. troops left Afghanistan, thus ending a 20-year occupation. The exit has come at great cost, which includes the deaths of 13 American servicemen and women, and leaving behind thousands of U.S. allies.

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Despite all the justified cynicism out there these days, Cherokee County still has a number of folks who are not just willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to help others, but are eager to do it.

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Over a decade ago, TDP set policies to streamline the comment process on its Facebook page, and to facilitate discussions with a focus on accuracy and civility. To kick off a series explaining how TDP handles social media, a truncated version of TDP's posting policy is in order. On Friday, S…

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The congressman for Oklahoma’s 2nd District garnered much attention this week after attempting an unauthorized evacuation of five U.S. citizens from the Taliban-controlled Afghanistan.

You can’t move 2 feet in public these days in any direction without seeing someone out sporting the latest in designer face masks, homemade face masks, or my personal favorite, the “medical” face mask that looks like a diaper strapped to the person's ears.

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Have you thanked a teacher lately? If not, you should. And while you're at it, you might thank a school administrator, support staff, and school board members. Few people are undertaking the challenges these folks face on a daily basis.

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When the Daily Press got on the social media train more than a decade ago, it began developing a series of policies to address problems the staff anticipated coming up. Over time, those problems have come to fruition – and even more have surfaced. Anyone who's on social media can understand …

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It's no exaggeration to say local entrepreneurs are concerned about the impact the resurgence of COVID-19 will have on their businesses. Unlike some area residents, they keep up with current events, and they know the Delta virus is far more contagious than the original strain.

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A number of elected officials tasked with leading the state of Oklahoma need to consider a crash course in constitutional law, or at least plug into an online dictionary and look up the word "democracy." There are some pretty intimidating words in Merriam Webster's explanation, but it all bo…

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Whether you believe COVID-19 is a hoax, or exaggerated, death should be no laughing matter. Yet for some, it is – and seeing a "laughing" emoji as a reaction to news that someone died or is gravely ill is repugnant. For that reason and others, media outlets are rethinking their approach to s…

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Was leaving Afghanistan a good move for the United States? For a certain segment of the population, it would have been until last year. But now, the removal of troops is being used as a political football. Those who were calling for withdrawal as recently as May are now condemning President …

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The battle against misinformation in which U.S. media are engaged is one of the most serious in modern memory. When it ends, there will be an untold number of casualties. All people of goodwill should hope truth is not one of them.

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Here's a question for those who decline the COVID vaccination, and won't wear face masks: Have you talked to your doctors, or are you just getting "fake news" from people on social media who are as ignorant about this deadly virus as you are?

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It took longer than it should have, but New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo finally called it quits. He did the right thing, although it won't make up for the allegations leveled against him.

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There's a big difference between a person saying he "heard from somewhere" a controversial bit of information, and falsely attributing those details to a specific source. When a person makes a claim that could be harmful to society, or could damage or destroy someone's reputation, it's incum…

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"Can't we all get along?" That question was asked by Rodney King, a Black man who was beaten by police after a high-speed chase in Los Angeles, on May 1, 1992. The answer? Obviously not.

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Conspiracy theorists are losing their grip, because they can't explain why the media, health care professionals, or some elected officials – both Republican and Democrat – are urging the public to commit mass suicide by getting vaccinated.

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A hash-tagged slogan making the rounds on social media the past few years looks like this: #stopthelies. It's time we all did that, whether at the U.S. Capitol, Oklahoma statehouse, or council chambers at Tahlequah City Hall.

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Discussions about "wardrobe malfunctions" are generally confined to rock stars performing during Super Bowl halftimes. But last week, it spilled over into the Olympics, although the kerfuffle turned out to be a product of "fake news."

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Comes now a group of Oklahoma lawmakers, taking time from their ostensibly busy schedules to pen a letter to The University of Oklahoma, complaining about its decision to ride away from the Big 12 conference and pasture with the Southeastern Conference.

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In summer 2018, the Supreme Court of the United States came down on the side of the Colorado baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. Ardent capitalists and many devout Christians – in what was once an example of strange bedfellows, but not so much today – hailed the ruling…

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Discussion over the Olympics, and whether they should have been held as planned, has filled the airwaves and the internet. Some feel the threat of COVID-19 transmission is too great – especially given the latest CDC declarations – and that by holding the games, Japan is being "irresponsible."

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The topic of animal welfare in Cherokee County can't be discussed without noting a bit of irony: Folks here are either passionate about the topic, or they are apathetic – and sometimes, even downright cruel.

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After the July 19 Tahlequah City Council meeting, a kerfuffle erupted, again proving that perspectives of one group can be the polar opposite of those on the other side. It also demonstrated how low society has sunk in terms of suspicion and hatred of "other," and it's rooted in politics. No…

Not every community project or feature has to be intended for profit. Many events and activities aren't necessarily "self-sustaining," but that doesn't mean they aren't worthwhile. Sometimes, the positive aspects make it worth expending taxpayer dollars to keep it alive.

Over the past few weeks, several Tahlequah Daily Press readers have called in seeking suggestions for "staycations." That's one of those urban terms used to identify a situation wherein a person or family takes time off from the daily grind - whether that be a place of employment, cleaning a…

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During debates, Ronald Reagan used a pithy phrase to disarm opponents: "There you go again." Observers noted that "The Great Communicator" was wryly implying the other guy was exaggerating, outright lying, or downright hysterical.

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