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A scientist with the Canary Islands' volcanology institute, Involcan, carries a rock of lava during field work in the surroundings of the volcano on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain, Saturday, Oct. 30, 2021. Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies available to them in 2021 to scrutinize — from land, sea, air, and even space — a rare volcanic eruption. But despite technological and scientific leaps, predicting volcanic eruptions and, more crucially, how they end, remains a mystery. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

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Scientists with the Canary Islands' volcanology institute, Involcan, inspect as the lava flows from a volcano on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain, Saturday, Oct. 30, 2021. Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies available to them in 2021 to scrutinize — from land, sea, air, and even space — a rare volcanic eruption. But despite technological and scientific leaps, predicting volcanic eruptions and, more crucially, how they end, remains a mystery. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

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A scientist with the Canary Islands' volcanology institute, Involcan, collects a rock of lava during field work in the surroundings of the volcano on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain, Saturday, Oct. 30, 2021. Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies available to them in 2021 to scrutinize — from land, sea, air, and even space — a rare volcanic eruption. But despite technological and scientific leaps, predicting volcanic eruptions and, more crucially, how they end, remains a mystery. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

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A scientist from IGME-CSIC (Spanish National Research Council) collects samples of volcanic ashes on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2021. Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies available to them in 2021 to scrutinize — from land, sea, air, and even space — a rare volcanic eruption. (AP Photo/Taner Orribo)

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A scientist from IGME-CSIC (Geological and Mining Institute of Spain from Spanish National Research Council) measures the temperature of lava near a volcano on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 5, 2021. Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies available to them in 2021 to scrutinize — from land, sea, air, and even space — a rare volcanic eruption. (AP Photo/Taner Orribo)

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Thursday's TDP is print and digital, and features our weekly Faith pages. Our writers are working on these stories:

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Chris Courchaine carries a Christmas tree he bought at Crystal River Christmas Trees in Alameda, Calif. on Nov. 26, 2021. Even Christmas trees aren't immune to the pandemic-induced shortages and inflation plaguing the economy. Extreme weather and supply chain disruptions have reduced supplies of both real and artificial trees this season. American shoppers should expect to have fewer choices and pay up to 30% more for both types this Christmas, industry officials say. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)

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David Cruise discusses artificial Christmas trees with a salesperson at the Balsam Hill showroom in Burlingame, Calif. on Nov. 19, 2021. Extreme weather and supply chain disruptions have led to shortages and higher prices for both real and artificial Christmas trees this year. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)